One-off tillage options for water repellent gravel soils

Submitted by author on Mon, 07/22/2019 - 14:29

This trial was designed to compare and assess the effectiveness of one-off tillage treatments on soil water repellence, water infiltration, crop establishment and productivity on a water repellent gravel. The trial was conducted on water repellent sandy gravel in Moora. All tillage treatments had a little effect on the management of SWR and plant establishment in the severe water repellent gravel sand at Moora. Nevertheless, yield improvements were recorded, in particular with the “Large offsets” and the “Modified one-way with standard discs” treatments.

Long-term dynamics of tillage impacts on repellent sandplain

Submitted by author on Mon, 07/22/2019 - 14:21

One-off soil inversion and deep soil mixing can ameliorate repellent soils, incorporate nutrients and remove some compaction. Trials to date have shown benefits in crop productivity and yield but a more detailed understanding of the changes in soil properties and crop performance over time is required to better understand the drivers of changes in productivity and implications of buried topsoil. This trial was located in Badgingarra on pale, yellow and deep water repellent sand.

Long-term assessment of management options for water repellent sandy gravel soils

Submitted by author on Mon, 07/22/2019 - 14:19

Over the past five years considerable research has been undertaken assessing options for water repellent sands but less has been done for the gravel soils. The aim of this research is to look at soil water repellence management options for sandy gravel soils over a four year period (until December 2018).

Longevity of deep ripping and topsoil inclusion in soils under controlled traffic farming; evidence from the second season

Submitted by author on Mon, 07/22/2019 - 14:18

Cultivation is the predominant management tool for subsoil compaction. This may be in the form of deep ripping, spading or ploughing – each with varying costs, benefits and disadvantages of the chosen application. The primary aim of this trial is to test increasing the economic viability of deep ripping using controlled traffic and the addition of topsoil and ameliorants to the subsoil. The trial was located in Moora on deep loamy yellow sand. The results showed the importance of ripping below the hard pan with deeper ripping.

Lime incorporation into acidic sandplain soils in the West Midlands

Submitted by author on Mon, 07/22/2019 - 14:12

This trial aimed to improve understanding of the range of tillage implements and techniques available to incorporate lime into acidic soils, their respective costs and benefits. The trial was located in Badgingarra on gravelly sand. There was a significant difference at both lime rates between the “Offset + rip” tillage treatment and the other tillage treatments. There was no significant difference between the nil lime and 3 T/ha lime treatments, despite the 0-10cm and 10-20cm pH differences.

Lime and cultivation demonstrations – pH monitoring

Submitted by author on Mon, 07/22/2019 - 14:05

Three demonstration sites were established over the 4 years looking at the interaction of lime rate and cultivation in changing subsoil pH. Sites were located in Warrdarge and North Badgingarra. Spading and mouldboarding to incorporate lime are both relatively expensive methods of increasing subsoil pH and reducing non-wetting. These NACC funded demonstrations aimed to asses the effectiveness of modified one-way plough at achieving subsoil pH change.

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Incorporating lime on forest gravel soils to combat soil acidity

Submitted by author on Mon, 07/22/2019 - 12:32

This trial was conducted by Southern Dirt and aimed to improve the adoption of liming practices in the medium to high rainfall zone of Western Australia by demonstrating the economic and environmental benefits of lime application and incorporation. The trial site was located 12km north of Kojonup and was chosen for its combination of targeted soil type (forest gravel) and pH range (4.5 – 4.8 CaCl2) up to a depth of 60cm.

Developing and testing innovative, practical and reliable methods for incorporating lime into acidic sandplain subsoils

Submitted by author on Mon, 07/22/2019 - 12:15

Increasing the pH of acidic subsoils in the West Midlands is necessary to increase crop water use and crop yields. A fast way of doing so is to mix lime into the subsoil; spading and mouldboarding are two common methods used in the West Midlands. Both methods are relatively expensive, so this trial aims to assess the effectiveness of a modified one-way plough at achieving subsoil pH change. This trial was located in Warradarge on deep sandy duplex soil.

Developing and testing innovative, practical and reliable methods for incorporating lime into acidic sandplain subsoils

Submitted by author on Mon, 07/22/2019 - 12:13

This trial aims to assess the effectiveness of simple and cheap ‘bolt-on’ attachments to deep ripper tines at incorporating topsoil and applied lime into acidic sandplain subsoils. This experiment was established in Dandaragan on a red loamy sand. The Long Bottom Boots functioned reasonably well at first, but tended to plug with soil from underneath after multiple passes and on finer textured soil to the south of the trial area.

Depth of tillage effects on deep sandplain soils

Submitted by author on Mon, 07/22/2019 - 12:12

This trial aims at characterizing the short and long term effects of ripping a mechanical hardpan to different soil depths. Understanding the interaction of managing mechanical hard pans with season is economically important to growers particularly in how they manage nitrogen fertilizer inputs. This experiment was established in Dandaragan on a deep yellow sand with compact and moderately acidic subsoil.